The Thing About Planting Trees

Outdoor Adventure, plants

Climbing Trees

I often get excited about the idea of planting trees near my home. Trees that will grow to become old, gnarled giants – beautiful sentient beings that amaze us. Then, a selfish reminder sets in. I will not be around to witness the transformation; my lignin endowed friends and I live on different timescales.

But wait. I can still plant things and watch them grow to large proportions in my lifetime! Trees, such as water loving willow species grow rapidly and reach mature size in just 15 years. Shrubs likes Red Osier Dogwood can grow to their maximum size in just a few years. Better yet – tall native perennials like Joe-Pye weed can grow a foot taller than me by its 2nd year of growth.

Still, how many of us have watched a little green Shagbark Hickory sapling spring 120 feet upward and put on fierce slabs of gnarled bark, pointing every which way? How many of us have planted American Sycamore and hung around long enough to see its smooth gray bark become a rugged mass, adorned with white, brown, and gray-green flakes? In the winter, the Sycamore takes on a ghostly form, as monster’s white tentacles reach out over icy water.

Finally, I come full circle and realize that my initial excitement is valid. Shortsighted are gardeners who plants trees for themselves only. Who am I to prevent air and water purification, food and shelter for living organisms, and many other gifts offered by trees? Plant trees I will – and if the exotic bug doesn’t get them, maybe my grandchildren will have a magical place to swing and climb

Partridge Berry (Mitchella repens)

hiking, Outdoor Adventure, plants

Mitchella repens (Partridge berry). This is an often overlooked, wonderful evergreen ground cover for shade/part shade in the garden. It is fairly common in the deciduous forest understory. Unfortunately, I didn’t find any with the red berries still intact (which I hear are edible). This plant is somewhat slow growing and it eventually forms a dense carpet. When in bloom, the little white flowers are structured so that they prevent self-fertilization, thus promoting genetic diversity! And, it is the only plant in its genus in North America.

Native Plant Wedding Bouquet

Art, watercolor

This painting was created for my cousin as a wedding gift. Plants included in this bouquet are all native to northeastern North America. This piece is somewhat imaginative because plants, such as flowering dogwood bloom in early spring, in contrast with our native hibiscus, which bloom closer to August. Therefore, this particular arrangement of fresh flowers may not be possible in practice, but it is way cool as a work of art 🙂  

Plants included in this bouquet:

-Swamp Rose Mallow / Hibiscus (Hibiscus moscheutos)
-Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida)
-Sundial lupine (Lupinus perennis)
-Pearly Everlasting (Anaphalis margaritacea)