Winter of 1780

Art, watercolor

Winter of 1780 in Morristown was a brutal situation for the continental army – solders were given almost nothing to eat and supplies were scare. Meanwhile, General Washington and other high ranked officials stayed at the Ford Mansion with plenty to eat. I suppose little has changed since then; a few benefit while the majority struggles.

At this time of year, I am always grateful that I can get warm whenever I want to. This painting is a representation of the hardship that these men endured as they fought for independence from Britain. Fire was crucial for both survival and sending warning signals of British attack.

Winter of 1780 in Morristown, New Jersey

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Here’s are work in progress photos for this painting.

Original idea sketch for composition

Starting to lay in some of the washes and trees

The pines dry much lighter in color than expected

Time to refine and define values better

Winter of 1780 (w/c 14×20”)

Historic Wick Farm

Art, New Jersey, Outdoor Adventure

The Wick house is a simple old farm house, but I can’t seem to just walk past it without staring at it for half an hour. During the revolutionary war, the continental army used this place as a campground during the coldest winters on record. I usually visit the Wick farm in the winter when it’s easier to imagine the cold and hunger that these soldiers endured. The image above is a painting of the Wick farm in late fall on a cold foggy day. The woods surrounding the farm always give off an eerie vibe as if the presence of the men that served in the war is still there.